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12/16/2015
Jocelyn Rose, a professor of plant biology and director of Cornell's Institute of Biotechnology, is examining the hydrophobic cellular surface layer known as the cuticle in fleshy fruits.
12/15/2015
Cornell Tech and Roosevelt Island public school P.S./I.S. 217 on Dec. 10 unveiled a three-year program that will train teachers to incorporate computer science activity across the curriculum.
12/15/2015
A new study reveals that zinc deficiency – a condition that affects 25 percent of the world’s population, especially in the developing world – alters the makeup of bacteria found in the intestine.
12/15/2015
A highly visible dog ear tag to mark and monitor treated and untreated strays is being developed by Cornell engineering and fiber science faculty though the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future.
12/15/2015
In her annual State of the Medical College address Dec. 7, Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher, the Stephen and Suzanne Weiss Dean of Weill Cornell Medicine, said WCM is at the forefront of scientific innovation.
12/14/2015
According to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine, pre-existing lung inflammation may increase the risk that cancers beginning elsewhere will spread to that organ, suggesting new therapies.
12/10/2015
Gov. Cuomo's Upstate Revitalization Initiative awarded $500 million to the Southern Tier Regional Economic Development Council. President Garrett said it will 'help the Southern Tier become a global leader in new agricultural technology.'
12/10/2015
The Southern Tier Regional Economic Development Council has won $500 million over the next five years in New York's Upstate Revitalization Initiative. Cornell will be involved in about $100 million worth of key projects funded by the grant.
12/10/2015
The Southern Tier Regional Economic Development Council has won $500 million over the next five years in New York's Upstate Revitalization Initiative. Cornell will be involved in about $100 million worth of key projects funded by the grant.
12/10/2015
New research by Cornell Information Science finds that after dropping off Facebook, we are lured back by a number of factors that influence decisions about social media use.

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